2018 City Budget

Consultation has concluded

Oshawa City Council has approved the 2018 City Budget, which takes a balanced approach to ensuring quality services and programs for our community members while at the same time investing in the future of the city.

The 2018 City Budget:

  • balances competing priorities and challenges while at the same time providing affordable services and programs that our community needs;
  • invests in our city by maintaining and building infrastructure, including roads, sidewalks, trails and parks;
  • saves for the future by increasing our reserves to ensure the financial health of the city; and,
  • includes a decrease in debt payments.

Learn more about the 2018 City Budget on our budget webpage.

Thank you to community members for participating in the 2018 City Budget process. Engagement opportunities included a telephone town hall, balance the budget interactive online tool, live online Q&A and a feedback form, which resulted in a combined total of more than 560 feedback submissions. Your feedback was shared with Council and City staff as part of the 2018 City Budget process.

Oshawa City Council has approved the 2018 City Budget, which takes a balanced approach to ensuring quality services and programs for our community members while at the same time investing in the future of the city.

The 2018 City Budget:

  • balances competing priorities and challenges while at the same time providing affordable services and programs that our community needs;
  • invests in our city by maintaining and building infrastructure, including roads, sidewalks, trails and parks;
  • saves for the future by increasing our reserves to ensure the financial health of the city; and,
  • includes a decrease in debt payments.

Learn more about the 2018 City Budget on our budget webpage.

Thank you to community members for participating in the 2018 City Budget process. Engagement opportunities included a telephone town hall, balance the budget interactive online tool, live online Q&A and a feedback form, which resulted in a combined total of more than 560 feedback submissions. Your feedback was shared with Council and City staff as part of the 2018 City Budget process.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • The following question was submitted via the online 2018 City Budget feedback form on January 4: Why is animal services not separate from public services it is attached to? Animal Welfare has no place included in waste management, blue boxes and the condition of roads etc. There is never enough funding to help animals in need that are part of this municipality because it is being shared out to the other services in the group it is attached to. Have animal services a separate entity.

    12 months ago

    Thank you for your question and feedback.

    Animal Services is an operational division within Strategic and Business Services, which falls within the Community Services Department. Animal Services has its own budget which has been proposed at $565,330 for 2018.

  • What are the internal controls for spending, for example, I was a volunteer member on the Oshawa Accessibility Advisory Committee, the Capital Planner and Project Manager would present propose projects for 2018 without any analysis for a Return On Investment for each project - and have other project delays due to funding shortages. What is being done to minimize the funding leakages within the Facilities Department?

    AdamRyanWhite asked 12 months ago

    The City of Oshawa has a rigorous system of internal controls to safeguard and monitor all of the City’s finances. The City’s external auditors perform an examination of the City’s internal control system on an annual basis. In addition, the City has internal auditors who perform operational, value for money and governance audits. These audits are designed to identify potential areas of corporate risk.

  • What is the vision and mission of the 2018 Budget? How did the Treasurer collect data and analysis it to shape this 2018 budget? Are there any Initiatives to invest in a creative and green infrastructure towards urbanizing downtown as part of the Plan 20/20?

    AdamRyanWhite asked 12 months ago

    Thank you for your questions and for joining the Q&A session.

    The 2018 budget was developed in conjunction with the requirements outlined in the Municipal Act to prepare a balanced budget. Some of the major themes included in the 2018 budget are: continue building reserves; paying down debt; and keeping taxes affordable. City staff from all departments contribute data and information to the budget submission.

    Included in the budget submission and 9-Year Capital Forecast are a number of downtown streetscape projects that respond to Plan 20/20 as well as projects related to green initiatives throughout the city.

  • Is there an incentive program for corporations to move businesses out to Oshawa? We have the land in the north, is there a business development team devoted to this?

    Shayda47 asked 12 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    The City of Oshawa offers a number of incentive programs to encourage business investment within the city.

    Within the city’s urban area, the City does not charge City Development Charges for industrial development. The City also has a grant program to assist landowners in the rehabilitation and cleanup of brownfield (contaminated) sites. Additional incentive programs are in place for specific parts of the City and vary from area to area. They are summarized on the City’s website on the Incentives and Programs webpage. For example, within the downtown, grants are available for constructing new residential and commercial buildings, renovating existing buildings with respect to improving a building’s façade, accessibility, building systems or creating residential units on the upper floors.

    The programs are administered by the Development Services Department. For more information, please contact the Economic Development branch at business@oshawa.ca

  • I know there are ATMP projects in 2018 but will there be any more cycling facilities added ? besides what was submitted by the city for cycling commuter grant

    arruda_j asked 12 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    Included in the 2018 proposed capital budget is a project for the expansion of the City’s cycling network, which implements cycling facilities as outlined in the Active Transportation Master Plan. The focus of this implementation is to create and expand the connected network of facilities throughout the city.

    In addition, the City has also budgeted for a number of trail development projects.

  • Are there plans to operate the airport similar to Billy Bishop or Hamilton airports? This could be lucrative as more people move into the region they don't want to drive an hour to Pearson and pay one of the highest flight taxes in the country. What are the challenges with expanding to commercial flying?

    Shayda47 asked 12 months ago

    The Oshawa Executive Airport plays a key role in the Durham Region economy and supports medical, police, military, corporate and recreational needs for Durham Region, the Greater Toronto Area and southern Ontario. Flight training, air ambulance, passenger charter services, freight services, aerial police operations, aircraft maintenance and aircraft restoration services are all provided at the airport. Recently, NAV Canada invested $8 million for construction of a new control tower, and the City of Oshawa invested $6 million into the Oshawa Executive Airport to attract jobs and grow Durham Region’s economy. At this point and as per Council direction, there are no plans to pursue scheduled passenger services due to noise sensitivity with the surrounding community.

  • Note: The question below was submitted via email following the November 1st telephone town hall. I live in a condominium townhouse development and we are not allowed green bins which I understand is part of the city waste disposal system and the city gets some sort of revenue from this. My taxes are not any lower than anyone else in this area so why is the city not picking up green bins trash from condominium townhouses? I feel that this is an injustice and that my taxes should be lowered or the service implemented.

    about 1 year ago

    Thank you for your inquiry.

    The City of Oshawa provides green bin collection on behalf of the Region of Durham who is responsible for the composting of green bin material (organics).  The City does not receive revenue from the processing of this material.

    The determination of municipal collection services on private property, for locations such as townhouse condo complexes, is typically made during the site plan approval process prior to construction. During this time, the City works with developers to ensure that City standards for waste collection services are met.  In some cases the developer chooses not to meet our standards in which case the complex must provide their own waste collection through private collection services. Where the City’s collection standards are met the City of Oshawa can provide waste collection services on private property.  Depending on the design of the complex, the City may provide curbside collection, which would also include green bin collection. However in some cases the design of the complex (i.e. road widths/turning radius etc.) limits collection vehicle access. In these situations the City may provide front-end waste collection services through the use of  bulk bins (a centralized drop off location).  Bulk collection of green bin material provides a challenge when processing as the material tends to contain more contamination not suitable for composting at the Region’s compost facility. 

    The success of the Region’s green bin program is dependent on well separated organics material which is difficult to achieve where bulk collection is provided. Hopefully future enhancements to the composting process will allow for materials from bulk collection to be collected and diverted but at this time we regret we are unable to provide the service due to these challenges.

  • Note: The question below was submitted via email on November 2. I joined the City budget telephone town hall meeting on November 1. It is a great idea to engage the residents. However, it is a time limited forum and I found that many of the questions were unrelated to the city or to the budget. I suggest that before the meeting you communicate clearly what is included in the City budget. For example, there were several questions about busing and that is not the responsibility of the city. Something like a simple fact sheet that says WHAT's IN and WHAT's NOT and for the what's not categories such as busing you could add a link to the appropriate agency.

    about 1 year ago

    Thank you for taking part in the telephone town hall meeting on the City budget. We appreciate you listening in to the conversation and for sharing your feedback.

    Thanks for the great suggestion to communicate clearly in advance what programs and services are and are not included in the City Budget. We have added your suggestion to our notes should we have another town hall in the future.

    Furthermore, in advance of the January 4th, 2018 live Q&A on Connect Oshawa on the proposed 2018 City Budget, we will make sure to include information on the site about the programs and services that are provided through the City Budget, as well as information on the types of Regional services that are not included in the municipal budget.

    In addition, we have added a weblink to City vs Regional Services on www.connectoshawa.ca/budget.

    We hope you continue to participate in the 2018 City Budget process.

  • Note: The feedback and questions below were asked via phone (and summarized) following the November 1 telephone town hall on the City budget. I have a concern around accessibility in the city. Buildings are still being built that are inaccessible in the city (restaurants and private buildings) and washrooms are not accessible. I would like to see individuals with a disability consulted in the design of accessible washrooms. I am also concerned about specialized transit. Why do users have to call a week in advance to book a ride?

    about 1 year ago

    Thank you for your feedback and questions.

    You asked about accessibility in private buildings and restaurants. The City does not currently have authority to require building owners of restaurants/private buildings to install or modify for accessibility features unless it is a new construction, major renovation or property standards issue. The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (A.O.D.A.) does not require businesses to make accessible modifications to buildings (i.e. washrooms) unless there is a new construction or a major renovation. If there is a new construction or major renovation and a building permit is required, City staff ensures that the Ontario Building Code accessibility requirements are met. The City also has a provincially mandated Accessibility Advisory Committee where community members (many who have a disability), under the authority of the A.O.D.A., regularly review site plans for accessibility.

    In regards to City facilities, the City of Oshawa uses Oshawa Accessibility Design Standards (O.A.D.S.) to guide staff on the accessible construction and renovation of City facilities. In addition, the Oshawa Accessibility Advisory Committee members work with staff to conduct City facility audits and review site plans and other designs. For several years, Council has approved an annual sum of $120,000 for the removal of accessibility barriers at City facilities.

    The City also encourages the use of the Oshawa Accessibility Design Standards in the development community. Under the Community Improvement Program applicants must meet with the Accessibility Advisory Committee and complete an Accessibility Plan.

    You also asked about specialized transit. Durham Regional Transit including D.R.T. Specialized Services are the responsibility of the Region of Durham and therefore provided for in the Regional budget. For more information on the Regional budget, visit the Region of Durham website.

  • Are we ensuring that the 'Fat' in the budget is cut out or reduce. Have we conducted the analysis necessary to ensure that resources are allocated to areas with the greatest need. What steps are in place to Monitor in an direct manner to determine if the stated outcomes are being achieved within the earmark resources allocated and if not what established systems are in place to ensure the necessary corrective action is taken.

    Kbm asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for your question.

    The City’s budgets are quite lean which creates pressures as a growing community.  Council has adopted a continuous improvement framework from which staff apply LEAN methodologies to practices and procedures, as well as service reviews and risk management activities.  These actions help us ensure that the resources are allocated appropriately.  The City is challenged to meet operational needs, manage growth while respecting taxpayer affordability.

  • Note: The questions below were asked via phone following the November 1 telephone town hall on the City budget. I have the following budget questions about the Tribute Communities Centre: • How much do we pay per year for maintenance? • Loan repayment amount? • How many more years until paid off?

    about 1 year ago

    Hello,

    Thank you for participating in the City’s first-ever telephone town hall on the City budget and for your questions about the Tribute Communities Centre.

    You asked:

    1. How much do we pay per year for maintenance? The City allocates $400,000 per year to a reserve for capital maintenance work to be performed at the facility.

    2. What is the loan repayment amount? The loan repayment amount is approximately $3.5M annually

    3. How many more years until paid off? The debentures will be paid in full following the last payment in 2028

    Thank you again for your participation.

  • What will the City of Oshawa do regarding the ever-increasing Fire budget due to increased wages and salaries every year for firefighters. Firefighters have the arbitration laws stacked in their favour and a six-figure salary for every firefighter is unsustainable. It is a vital service but this is getting out of hand. Municipalities must unite to change the arbitration laws and make them work for the hard-working taxpayer. The same goes for the Police budget although this is a Durham Region issue.

    Angelos asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for your question.

    Municipalities across the board are feeling these pressures and do not have control over provincial and federal legislation.

    The annual City Budget takes into account and plans for a number of challenges and pressures including inflationary increases and contractual labour increases.

    Additionally, to provide some context on Fire Services, the 2017 operating budget for Fire Services is $26.3 million. This is approximately $158 per resident. Oshawa Fire Services provides 911 dispatch, fire prevention, fire suppression and education. This supports the operation and maintenance of 6 fire stations and 29 vehicles, emergency call response and fire inspections.