Smart Cities Challenge

Consultation has concluded

The City of Oshawa, in partnership with key stakeholders is embarking on a major community-driven initiative to identify opportunities for developing smart city solutions to address local issues.

In November 2017, Infrastructure Canada announced the Smart Cities Challenge requesting Canadian cities to collaborate with its residents, businesses, academic and civic organizations to design innovative projects that address their most pressing challenges using data and connected technologies.

Challenge Details

As part of the Smart Cities Challenge competition, each community will define its own "Challenge Statements" which can touch any aspect of community life. Potential projects to address the challenges should be designed to apply technology to make residents feel safe and secure, earn a good living, move around their community, enjoy a healthy environment, be empowered and included in society and live an active and healthy life.

Have Your Say, Oshawa

The City of Oshawa is taking a three-phased approach for the Smart Cities Challenge: Community Engagement & Consultation; Project Identification & Selection; and, Business Plan Development. Learn how you can get involved at each step:

Phase 1: Community Engagement & Consultation

The City looked to the Oshawa community and stakeholders to identify community needs and project ideas for the development of "Challenge statements."

Phase 1 concluded on February 2, 2018, which resulted in more than 450 received surveys. Thank you to community members for completing the survey and attending the earlier open house.

Phase 2 & 3: Project Identification & Selection, and Business Plan Development

In Phase 2, the City looked to the Oshawa community and stakeholders to provide input on what is needed for residents in the Lakeview Community (the southern portion of Oshawa, south of Highway 401) to fully access the internet and digital community resources and services.

Prizes

Infrastructure Canada has structured the program as a competition offering finalists $250,000 to further develop their project and winning municipalities between $5 and $50 million to be used to implement their Smart City project.

The City of Oshawa, in partnership with key stakeholders is embarking on a major community-driven initiative to identify opportunities for developing smart city solutions to address local issues.

In November 2017, Infrastructure Canada announced the Smart Cities Challenge requesting Canadian cities to collaborate with its residents, businesses, academic and civic organizations to design innovative projects that address their most pressing challenges using data and connected technologies.

Challenge Details

As part of the Smart Cities Challenge competition, each community will define its own "Challenge Statements" which can touch any aspect of community life. Potential projects to address the challenges should be designed to apply technology to make residents feel safe and secure, earn a good living, move around their community, enjoy a healthy environment, be empowered and included in society and live an active and healthy life.

Have Your Say, Oshawa

The City of Oshawa is taking a three-phased approach for the Smart Cities Challenge: Community Engagement & Consultation; Project Identification & Selection; and, Business Plan Development. Learn how you can get involved at each step:

Phase 1: Community Engagement & Consultation

The City looked to the Oshawa community and stakeholders to identify community needs and project ideas for the development of "Challenge statements."

Phase 1 concluded on February 2, 2018, which resulted in more than 450 received surveys. Thank you to community members for completing the survey and attending the earlier open house.

Phase 2 & 3: Project Identification & Selection, and Business Plan Development

In Phase 2, the City looked to the Oshawa community and stakeholders to provide input on what is needed for residents in the Lakeview Community (the southern portion of Oshawa, south of Highway 401) to fully access the internet and digital community resources and services.

Prizes

Infrastructure Canada has structured the program as a competition offering finalists $250,000 to further develop their project and winning municipalities between $5 and $50 million to be used to implement their Smart City project.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • More of a comment. Take a look at what the City of Kitchener launched — https://www.kitchener.ca/en/city-services/digital-kitchener-innovation-lab.aspx — An IoT lab that has three core facets. 1) To deliver cost savings to the City, 2) To experiment with new technologies and be first to market, 3) to work with entrepreneurs and help them develop new technology ideas that would, in turn, benefit the city. The lab is funded by the savings they created by implementing a few smart city strategies (I believe the move to LED lighting is where they saved the biggest upfront). The lab is run by Karl Allen-Muncey and I have already spoken with him about replicating the model if there was a desire to do so. A City of Oshawa IoT lab would be a great initiative.

    patricklyver asked 11 months ago

    Hi patricklyver, thank you for your feedback. The Digital Kitchener Innovation Lab sounds like an excellent initiative. We’ll be sure to examine that model in relation to our existing Teaching City initiative and Spark Centre partnership.

  • What is the Challenge statement?

    11 months ago

    To begin, each community will define some Challenge Statements and then pick one as a project to focus upon. 

    A Challenge Statement is a single sentence that identifies a pressing community need and then defines the outcome or outcomes a community aims to achieve by implementing its smart cities proposal. The Challenge Statement must be measurable, ambitious, and achievable through the proposed use of digital technology. Find Challenge statement examples on the Infrastructure Canada, Smart Cities webpage.

  • What is the Smart Cities Challenge?

    12 months ago
    In November 2017, Infrastructure Canada announced the Smart Cities Challenge requesting Canadian cities to collaborate with its residents, businesses, academic and civic organizations to design innovative projects using digital and connected technologies to help address their most pressing local challenges.

    Infrastructure Canada has structured the program as a competition offering finalists $250,000, and winning municipalities between $5 and $50 million to be used to implement a Smart City project. Depending on community size and category, the winning submission could be awarded:

    • The large prize of $50 million;
    • One of two prizes of $10 million for mid-sized communities;
    • The small community prize of $5 million; or
    • The Indigenous community prize of $5 million.

  • What is a Smart City?

    12 months ago

    Infrastructure Canada describes Smart Cities as those that use technology and data to improve livability and opportunities for the city and its people. They note that Smart Cities have the potential to improve every aspect of community life – how people move around, how they live and play, how they earn a living, how they learn and are empowered to participate in society, how they interact with the natural environment, and how they create safe and secure public spaces. 

    A smart city approach is one that delivers meaningful outcomes for residents by letting communities lead the way by harnessing technology in ways that are open, integrated, transferable and collaborative.

  • What are some examples of Smart City projects? What have other communities done?

    12 months ago

    • St. Albert, Alberta has implemented its NextBus system that provides residents with a mobile application that links to GPS systems installed in the local buses. This allows a rider see where their bus is on Google Maps and allows them to be notified when their bus is about to arrive. 
    • Boston, Massachusetts has launch BOS:311 a mobile application that allow residents using their mobile phones to instantly report city issues such as potholes, graffiti, blocked drains or faulty street lights. Once a report, and any related pictures, are submitted, a work order is issued and residents can track when it will be fixed. 
    • Guelph, Ontario, working with the University of Toronto, has installed miniature air quality monitoring devices at a number of school locations around the city. They are using the data to evaluate school drop off zones to see if restrictions or modifications to traffic near the zones is needed.

  • Why is Oshawa participating in the Smart Cities Challenge?

    12 months ago

    Oshawa and its community partners have a history of using digital technology to address local issues and opportunities and continually improve municipal operations. The range and depth of the community’s use of technology resulted in Oshawa being named a Smart21 Community by the Intelligent Community Forum.  The City and local partners have a number of smart city projects either completed or underway. Two of the many examples include:
    • Oshawa Senior Citizens Centres Digital Inclusion Program, which offers free internet at all seniors’ facilities with computer labs and 11 cyber cafés. The Brain Gym program uses iPads to assist seniors with dementia. 
    • Road Weather Information System (RWIS) uses sensors implanted into roads to measure weather and road surface conditions and connect to data from weather stations. The city can better predict its snow plowing needs and has saved money in doing so.
    This experience provides a foundation from which to undertake the preparation of a Smart Cities Challenge application, identify community challenges where digital technology can make a difference and then move forward on priority projects.

  • What is required to submit an application to the Smart Cities Challenge?

    12 months ago

    Infrastructure Canada’s Smart Cities Challenge Guidelines note that the application must be submitted by a local government with the support of its Council. The application must:
    • Identify important community needs based on research and community input 
    • Engage the community with respect to picking one priority project for implementation
    • Show how the use of digital technology could have a measurable impact/benefit 
    • List the community and private sectors partners that will help deliver the project 
    • Describe how and when the project will be implemented

  • Who is working with the City on the application?

    12 months ago

    A City staff team has been assembled, led by Economic Development Services, to prepare the application in time for the Challenge’s April 24, 2018 deadline. Those community organizations that were involved in the Intelligent Community Forum ranking exercise have reconvened to assist with the current Challenge. They include, among others, the Oshawa Public Library, Public and Separate School Boards, the Oshawa Chamber of Commerce, Lakeridge Health, the Oshawa Clinic, Durham Workforce Authority, Unemployed Help Centre, UOIT, Durham College, Trent University Durham, Spark Centre and the Oshawa Public Utilities Corporation. The list of stakeholders involved is growing on an on-going basis. Additional community and private sector participants are welcome to join the process. 

  • How can I get involved with the Smart Cities Challenge?

    12 months ago

    The Smart Cities Challenge presents an incredible opportunity to build upon Oshawa’s existing Smart City initiatives by engaging the community in identifying further opportunities where smart city solutions can be developed and applied. Local residents and business are strongly encouraged to become involved by: 
    • Answering a survey on community needs and priorities on Connect Oshawa, or in –person at Service Oshawa, located at City Hall
    • Attending the Smart Cities Challenge open house on Thursday, February 1 to learn more about the initiative
    • Participating in the Town Hall discussion on selecting a priority project (date to be announced)
    • Writing letters of support for the project once it is chosen

  • How will Infrastructure Canada evaluate the applications?

    12 months ago

    Infrastructure Canada is establishing an independent panel to assess the applications from across the country. Short listed communities will be invited to develop more detailed proposals and business plans and awarded $250,000 to help them do so. They will be looking at the following criteria, among others, as they evaluate the projects:
    • The project reflects the true needs of the community
    • Project benefits are achievable through the use of digital technology
    • The benefits are meaningful and measurable
    • Strong engagement with, and collaboration between, local residents, community and business groups
    • Ability to scale projects and their transferability to other communities