Trap-Neuter-Release-Manage Program Consultation

Consultation has concluded.

The City of Oshawa is undertaking a public consultation process to overview the need for a Trap-Neuter-Release-Manage (T.N.R.M.) program. The purpose of the public consultation is to:

  • understand Oshawa’s needs;
  • assess what is required to establish a T.N.R.M. program;
  • overview T.N.R.M. best practices; and,
  • to determine whether a T.N.R.M. program is required at this time.

Community members are invited to submit feedback. Online and in-person opportunities include:

  • Public consultation session on Wednesday, June 7 from 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the Civic Recreation Complex (99 Thornton Rd. S.), Bobby Orr meeting room.
  • Online survey on Connect Oshawa from Tuesday, May 23 to Friday, June 23.
  • In-person survey at Service Oshawa (City Hall, 50 Centre St. S.) and Oshawa Animal Services (919 Farewell St.) from Tuesday, May 23 to Friday, June 23.

Feedback from the online and in-person opportunities will be received until Friday, June 23rd and will be included in the report to Oshawa City Council by the third quarter of 2017.

The City of Oshawa is undertaking a public consultation process to overview the need for a Trap-Neuter-Release-Manage (T.N.R.M.) program. The purpose of the public consultation is to:

  • understand Oshawa’s needs;
  • assess what is required to establish a T.N.R.M. program;
  • overview T.N.R.M. best practices; and,
  • to determine whether a T.N.R.M. program is required at this time.

Community members are invited to submit feedback. Online and in-person opportunities include:

  • Public consultation session on Wednesday, June 7 from 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the Civic Recreation Complex (99 Thornton Rd. S.), Bobby Orr meeting room.
  • Online survey on Connect Oshawa from Tuesday, May 23 to Friday, June 23.
  • In-person survey at Service Oshawa (City Hall, 50 Centre St. S.) and Oshawa Animal Services (919 Farewell St.) from Tuesday, May 23 to Friday, June 23.

Feedback from the online and in-person opportunities will be received until Friday, June 23rd and will be included in the report to Oshawa City Council by the third quarter of 2017.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
  • If the proposed T.N.R.M program is approved, how can I get involved as a volunteer?

    Lauren asked over 1 year ago

    Thank you for your interest in T.N.R.M. and volunteering. Please watch our website for possible volunteer opportunities in the future as details are finalized.





  • The program suggested is very good. If a cat from a wild colony is simply caught and spayed and not put back into the colony, the cat colony will make up the number itself by inviting another stray cat into its colony. By treating the cat and returning a sterile cat to the colony, the numbers are not upset and eventually the colony will die out by attrition. I am a birder and witness stray cats attack birds regularly, as nature dictates. If the number of cats declines in this 'natural' way, I will be a hapy camper. Can I contribute to this cause with a financial gift?

    marne b. asked over 1 year ago

    Thank you for your interest and taking the time to review the options. If you haven’t already done so please complete the online survey so your feedback is captured as part of the public consultation. Once we have gathered input and decided on a direction it will be communicated, and options for the public to further participate will also be announced.


  • No question, just a comment. I support the idea of controlling the feral and stray cat populations because of their serious impact on song birds , especially since many birds are experiencing declining numbers. The cats' impact on the birds has been well documented. It also of course helps the cats themselves to be examined and monitored. Please go forward with your plan!

    jim jackson asked over 1 year ago

    Hi Jim, thank you for your comment. If you haven't yet, be sure to capture them in the survey as well!

  • Why are you wasting taxpayers money by not removing and killing these pests. Instead you want rerelease this invasive species. A proven threat to native species and the ecosystem.

    Tyler asked over 1 year ago

    Thank you for your question and feedback. The T.N.R.M. program would be a volunteer program monitored by Oshawa Animal Services and Oshawa's Municipal Law Enforcement.

    Under a cat colony management program, volunteers managing the colonies would:

    • humanely trap, spray/neuter and vaccinate free roaming cats returning them to where they were found or to other suitable locations;
    • provide basic food/shelter;
    • keep accurate records of treated/released feral cats;
    • maintain community relations;
    • remove social kittens/cats for adoption

    The proposed options that permit cat colonies in certain areas within the City also prohibit them in the City’s “Natural Heritage System” or designated ecologically sensitive areas where unique wildlife/endangered species and plants are found.

  • What is a feral cat?

    over 1 year ago

    Outdoors, a feral cat:

    • will not approach and will likely seek hiding places to avoid people;
    • may belong to a colony;
    • is unlikely to make eye contact;
    • won't meow, beg, or purr;
    • is more likely to be nocturnal; may occasionally be out during the day; and,
    • will probably have a clean, well-kept coat potentially with scars from fighting.

    A trapped feral cat:

    • cannot be touched, even by a caregiver;
    • will likely stay in the back of the cage and retreat as far back as possible;
    • if jolted or frightened, may shake, rattle or climb the cage, and could become injured banging into the cage;
    • will remain tense and unsocial;
    • will likely ignore all people and toys, and possibly even food;
    • will not show any familiarity or interest in household sounds; and,
    • will be aggressive and lash out if threatened or cornered (signs of aggression include ears back and eyes dilated).
  • What is a stray cat?

    over 1 year ago

    Outdoors, a stray cat:

    • may approach people, houses, porches or cars;
    • will likely live alone, not be part of a group;
    • might walk and move like a house cat, such as walking with tail up - a sign of friendliness;
    • will probably look at you, blink or make eye contact;
    • may be vocal, meow or "answer" your voice;
    • will be visible primarily during the daytime; and,
    • will probably be dirty or disheveled.

    Trapped, a stray cat:

    • may let you touch it eventually or tolerate a small about of touching with an object;
    • may come to the front of the cage;
    • may eventually rub against the cage in a friendly way;
    • may relax over time;
    • may investigate toys or food placed near the edge of the cage;
    • may respond to household sounds like cat food cans or bags being opened; and,
    • may hiss or growl to show anxiety.
  • What is a T.N.R.M. program?

    over 1 year ago

    A T.N.R.M. Program would be a volunteer program monitored by Oshawa Animal Services and Oshawa's Municipal Law Enforcement.

    Under a cat colony management program, volunteers managing the colonies would:

    • humanely trap, spray/neuter and vaccinate free roaming cats returning them to where they were found or to other suitable locations;
    • provide basic food/shelter;
    • keep accurate records of treated/released feral cats;
    • maintain community relations;
    • remove social kittens/cats for adoption.

  • How does a T.N.R.M. program work?

    over 1 year ago

    1. Trap: after adequate preparations, including educating the public about the T.N.R.M. process, colony cats are trapped using humane traps.
    2. Neuter: the captured cats are brought in their traps to a spay/neuter provider. Typically, T.N.R.M. programs also provide vaccinations against certain diseases.
    3. Return/Release: after recovery from surgery, feral cats are returned to where they were trapped and are supplied with ongoing access to food and fresh water.
    4. Colony caretakers provide appropriate care to colony and monitor and evaluate success of T.N.R.M. program.